Positive Futures, a Liverpool based youth development charity who work to help young people achieve their full potential through a variety of support systems has recently partnered with Wigzee Woo to create headgear for children at Alder Hey Children’s Hospital. The Positive Futures participants were attendees of their weekly Open Access Sessions, which take place in their youth hub on Tetlow Way, Liverpool.

Wigzee Woo is a charity centered on crocheting wigs for children going through cancer treatment. This is largely done by hosting ‘Wigathons’ where large groups get together to make a wide selection of wigs that are soft on sensitive scalps to send to hospitals where children are being treated. They are aiming to distribute 4000 wigs to children undergoing treatment. You can find out more on their website.

Positive Futures took part in this project, and over the course of two months 35 pieces of headgear were made and distributed to Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, along with messages of hope from the attendees.  Around 1 child per 500 in Great Britain will be diagnosed with cancer by age 14. Positive Futures are delighted to be able to offer some support to children going through such a difficult time.

As one young person wrote “Everyday may not be a good day, but there is good in every day.”

The collaboration between the two charities doesn’t stop there. Positive Futures are hosting a ‘Wigathon’ where everybody is invited to help in making as many wigs as possible. Following on from this Positive Futures will be hosting regular Wigzee Woo sessions every Tuesday from the 25th February for eight weeks. These sessions are open to anybody aged 8-24 and the more people, the more wigs, so everybody is invited to take part! Positive Futures aim to have 200 wigs crocheted in total.

Talking of this incredible cause and the hard work of so many participants, Positive Futures CEO Clare Corran said:

“Our staff and young people were touched and humbled by the work that Wigzee Woo does. Cancer has touched many lives of the staff and participants here at PF, so this was our small way of giving back to others at a very difficult time in their life.

“The response from our young people was inspiring, and some of the messages they passed along were incredibly emotional. Our young people know what it’s like to face and overcome challenges in life, but the empathy that they demonstrated was a true credit to them. We could not be prouder of their hard work.”

Positive Futures ran 403 Open Access Sessions last year and 94% of attendees said they felt safe at Positive Futures. Find out more in their Annual Report.